Summary #SMMW13 – Chris Brogan: social media isn’t the answer

chris brogan #SMMW13This is the first summary of the second day at Social Media Marketing World 2013, recalling the most important points of the talk given by Chris Brogan. I’ll dedicate a whole post to this speech because it deserves it.

Chris Brogan: You’re not going to like this but social media isn’t the answer

This is probably the reason why I came to this event; being able to see the person who’s inspired me since my first day working in new media back in 2007: Chris Brogan. I remember his was the first blog I subscribed to and the first person I followed on Twitter. Since then, I’ve tried to read all his posts, every day, keeping also those I’ve been unable to reed (I have approximately 1,500 emails containing his daily posts.)

Chris is probably the most respected person in the Social Web. This is something you notice when you share a round-table conference with him and other professionals as important as Jay Baer or Mario Sundar tell the audience, “I want to be like Chris Brogan”. He went straight to the point and touched on topics and concepts that no one else talked about during the event. He explained techniques and uses, sharing his knowledge in great detail and depth.

He talks with self-assurance about what he does, sharing useful and valuable reflections with the audience. As the audience, you realise you’re seeing someone who is capable of changing everything. These are the most relevant points I extracted from Chris Brogan’s speech:

  • Stop 80% of what you’re doing and work on the 20% that is making your business happen.
  • Create more businesses, many.
  • Followers don’t stop you from having to pay your mortgage.
  • When Twitter makes you put on weight, lose time and lose control of your followers, then put Twitter on a diet, cut down the time you dedicate to it and stop following those you’re not really following.
  • 200,000 Twitter followers aren’t as productive as the 20,000 blog readers who receive my newsletter every Sunday.
  • Talk about stories that people wish to learn from.
  • Tools are unimportant. What matters is what you’re capable of creating and how this is useful for people.
  • Find the quickest way for your readers to do something on your blog. Ask yourself, what would you like to happen right now? The answer’s easy: for people to subscribe to your newsletter.
  • Don’t work towards getting a larger number, work towards creating lists with the people who love you.

How to control your digital channel

  • If you’re not creating a digital empire, you’re missing your chance to reach the people who’re going to buy off you.
  • Foundations: a website that is responsive: we sell from our own site. However, we don’t simplify because we’ll usually do the following: “come to my store and then go on to any other page with all the information we publish to find distraction”.
  • Social test: Create a very human “About me” page. Connect and remain human.
  • Create a warm, human and simple landing page.
  • Measurements: there is only one measurement and it isn’t the number of newsletters; it’s the number of $$$ in the bank.
  • Empire: we need to improve in our creation of email lists.
  • Blog: my blog is important because more and more people find me because of the strange topics I talk about, not through social media.
  • Social Media: who cares? Time yourself and stop wasting your time on “the community”. Stop what you’re doing. Spend only a short time each day.
  • Sales: my blog produces money, it’s what I need and it also helps to sell my new products.
  • Community: mainly curation and engagement. No one wants to celebrate your victory, people want to celebrate their own victory.
  • Time: spend 39% of my time connecting with people and 51% doing business.

Create your digital platform

  • Blog (home base): here’s where all my effort is going to.
  • Video: I no longer do as much because it takes time and effort.
  • G+: I connect with my community.
  • Twitter: I create conversations and I’m human.
  • E-books: help to build email lists.
  • Podcast: I create community.
  • Email: I reach the people who love me.

Chris’s competitive advantage

During the Q&A after his speech, I wanted to ask Chris a question: “Chris, what’s your competitive advantage, besides your email subscription base?”. This was his answer: “The speed and skill with which I create content that is helpful and useful.” His answer speaks for itself.

Human

I was shocked when before I had time to introduce myself to ask the question, Chris said “My dear friend Isra García, thanks for being here”. That’s what I keep talking about when I refer to Human Media. However, what really grabbed me about meeting Chris Brogan in person was his honesty, humility, clarity and his commitment to giving the best of himself.

After the talk I wanted to greet him and I realised that he really puts his money where his mouth is: when I was going to shake his hand, instead, he gave me a big great hug, saying “We finally meet, it’s such an honour to meet you after such a long time. Thanks for being there always and thanks for reading me!” (This is what I was supposed to have told him, not the other way round! I did get to say it back though.)

He commits to his readers fully. He understands where the value of his brand is, what he does. And where the money in his bank account comes from. Undoubtedly, attending #SMMW13 has been worth it just by listening to and meeting Chris Brogan, as well as Guy Kawasaki.

However, another of the reasons to attend was to travel Route 66 and end up at Coachella, but that’s another story… and perhaps a post.

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Summary #SMMW13 Day 1 – Guy Kawasaki

guy kawasaki #SMMW13Second summary of the first day at #SMMW13 to tell you the most important things that Guy Kawasaki had to say. I’ve decided to write a whole post on this review because it’s really worth it.

Guy Kawasaki: how to build a platform

This was one of the speeches I wanted to attend the most. It was definitely worth it and way better than I expected. Guy Kawasaki shattered everyone’s preconceptions and exceeded their expectations. He knew what he was there for and what he needed to do to get us thinking. He started irreverently, elegantly correcting what the presenter had said about him. He also said he wasn’t here to talk about Google+ or his book but about how to create a successful online platform, possibly by using social platforms such as Google+. This is what I extracted in essence from Guy Kawasaki’s talk:

  • I don’t want friends, I’m here to do business. There are two types of people on the social web: those who want followers and those who lie.
  • Start tomorrow: in order to promote a product, service or book launch you need at least 9 months before you even get started on that product or book.

Segment your services: this is how Guy Kawasaki uses the Social Media

  • Facebook: for the people.
  • Twitter: perceptions.
  • Google+: sharing passions.
  • Pinterest: publishing and pinning.
  • LinkedIn: promotion.

Create a great profile:

  • Original.
  • With a great avatar, showing your face at the centre, not with your dog or car.
  • Attractive.
  • Your profile should work like on a dating site: “hot or not”. Someone visiting your profile should think: “hot”
  • Enticing others to connect with you.

Retrain yourself:

  • Share and help out, always and a lot.
  • Spend 5% of your time promoting yourself.
  • Add value in your own environment, share other people’s stories.

Add something special:

  • Pictures.
  • Videos.
  • Consider your answers and answer the questions made.
  • Cheat: seek out what is trending and become an ally with it.
  • Stay positive or go home. We need optimism, not doubt.

Negativity in the social media is like a boxing match:

  • Round 1 – publish.
  • Round 2 – react.
  • Round 3 – react to the reaction, fight.
  • Round 4 – comment again.
  • … and so on …

Repeat tweets:

  • Not everyone reading your tweets is your target.
  • Repeat 4 times a day: the return from 4 tweets is better than only one.
  • Out of one million fans, it’s usually 5/6 who complain: if no one complains about what you’re doing, there’s something you’re not doing right!
  • Don’t publish when Asia is awake, you’ll only get spam in return.

Google+

  • Create a private community to use as a “to-do” list for posts that you’re interested in sharing.
  • Use a clipboard tool to store content: Multiple Level Clipboard.
  • Tell stories that your community are interested in listening to: Alltop, Smartbrief or TEDxtalks on Youtube are ideal resources.
  • Communities: 1. create communities that refer to specific passions; 2. create internal communities with workflows in companies, teams in resources sites, editors, etc.

Tools:

  • “Do Share” – programme posts anywhere, including Google+.
  • Buffer – programme tweets.
  • “Nuke Comments” – this allows you to delete comments, block users and eliminate them all at once.
  • “Replies and more” – answer comments on Google+ directly to the user who mentioned you.
  • “Shareholic” – social sharing button that can be integrated in any website.

Guy Kawasaki’s strategy:

If you share content continuously, that content will reach people and it may add value. That could happen with your first content or your thousandth content. So, when you add value, someone or more than one will share. Every time someone shares, new people get to know you. The more people know you, more people will start finding interesting content among what you publish. And they’ll start following you; increasingly so. It is then that you’ll be able to use that 5% self-promotion to sell your book or product or service.

Final note

The following statement summarises Guy’s essence: “Curation is as valuable as creation.” Straightforward, fun, simple, smart, valuable and irreverent. It was, by far, the best talk on Day 1 and practically the whole event, only surpassed by Chris Brogan’s intervention on Day 2.

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Rutgers Online Mini-MBA: Social Media Marketing Program

The Rutgers Center for Management Development (CMD) will be offering an Online Mini-MBA: Social Media Marketing Program starting on February 28, 2011.  This unique Social Media Marketing course is the first online executive education program to be offered as one of the Rutgers Mini MBA programs.

centre for management development

“From Facebook to LinkedIn, Twitter and YouTube – firms and individuals are embracing social media platforms at an ever-increasing pace. This unique online program addresses the many issues surrounding this new phenomenon and provides a roadmap to help individuals and firms navigate social media to gain a competitive edge,” says Eric Greenberg, the Faculty Chair of the Online Social Media Marketing Mini MBA Course.

“While some people have flown to New Jersey from as far away as Seoul, South Korea, to take our in-class social media marketing course, we are excited to be able to offer our online course to a global audience. We will continue to increase the in-class offerings to additional locations, including China, but the online format will allow people, regardless of their location, to take advantage of our unique faculty and programs,” he adds.

Participants gain the knowledge, experience, and practical skills to immediately apply their learning in the workplace.

Justin Leshynski, the Vice President of Davanti Digital Media, who attended the first in-class social media marketing course in December 2010, created a video afterwards that is entitled, “Social Media for All: How Social Media Changed Small Business Marketing.”  The video says:

  • 75% of U.S. households use social media.
  • In 2010, 68% of small businesses increased their social media marketing, which drove immediate results to their business.
  • 20% of tweets are about products or brands.
  • Companies that blog receive 55% more traffic to their website than those that don’t.
  • 85% of social media users believe companies should interact with their customers.

Program

This program addresses questions such as:

  • How much should a firm invest in social media?
  • What are the best social media strategies and tactics to employ?
  • How can a firm measure and track social media?
  • How can a firm integrate social media into the overall marketing plan?
  • How can individuals employ social media to further their careers?

Topics

Topics covered include:

  • Intro to Social Media Marketing Strategy
  • Video & YouTube
  • Blogging for Business
  • Social Media Applications
  • Microblogging
  • Images & Social Media Marketing
  • Social News Networks
  • Viral Marketing
  • Online Reputation Management
  • Measuring Social Media ROI

The 12-week online faculty led program includes videos, faculty evaluated exercises, section quizzes, plus a final project and exam.  Additionally, different faculty members will host live weekly “Virtual Office Hours” throughout the program to discuss the most current developments in the field and answer student questions.  The program also features an innovative online learning environment, supported by a highly qualified team of Rutgers faculty mentors.

This online course is designed for executives or teams of professionals working in marketing, advertising, branding, communications, or sales. It is also appropriate for individuals seeking to employ social media to further their business careers.

The cost of the Online Mini-MBA: Social Media Marketing Program is $3,500, which includes all instructional materials and fees.

For more information go online to the Rutgers Center for Management Development at http://www.cmd.rutgers.edu/contact.html.

Greg Jarboe, the President of SEO-PR, is one of the industry experts in Social Media who will be teaching some of the modules in the Rutgers Online Mini-MBA: Social Media Marketing Program.

Review By Greg Jarboe

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